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of inequality. that is why it is a civil rights issue. those people need choices, but it will have an effect on the individual child and more kids will be better educated and it will have a catalytic effect on the system. so i would also say that as well. [applause] >> i would only add standards to that. i think it's important that we as a society, said very clear expectations for what it is. michael is a secretary of state, not in the sense that condoleezza rice was, but as a member of the cabinet there. the secretary of state and the united foundation for education. >> it has been an absolute pleasure to hear you. it is worth traveling across the united states. >> the ultimate compliment. >> the first time i have ever worried about you judging. [laughter] >> he made the point that national security, one of the reasons that america won the cold war is that they recognize it as a moral complex more than anything. and america realizes that they couldn't win these nations in particular. it was a precondition of winning across the globe. if you'll forgive me, but it's the same danger now. the e
of inequality. that's why it's called a civil rights issue. they need choices. it will have them an effect on the individual child more kids will be better educate and ting will have a effect on the -- so i would say -- [inaudible] [applause] >> i would only add standards. i think it's important as we as a society set expectations for what it is we want. the secretary of state -- not sense that cobbed lee -- condoleezza rice was the in the united nations where i got educate. i look forward to hearing from you. >> thank you. >> can i say it's been an absolute pressure to hear you. it was worth traveling coach class. [laughter] [applause] >> the ultimate. >> to hear you spike. >> the first time i ever worried about you. >> us a tear i have -- [laughter] but you made the point that idea massive when you are changing things. they matter in national security. one of the reasons that america won the cold war, it recognized it was a moral conflict as much as nick else. an american realized they couldn't win the cold war and the -- [inaudible] in particular if it still had a scandal of segregation
people and that's a high-tech in equality and that's why i've called it a civil rights issue. those people make choices, but it will have them an affect on individual child or kids would be better educated, and i think you'll have a catalytic effect on the system. so i would also say school choice. [applause] >> i would only add standards. it's important we as a society said very clear expectations, for what it is we want. the secretary of state -- as a member of the cabinet, secretary of state for education in the united kingdom where i got educated. so i look inward -- i look forward to hearing your questions. >> thank you very much. i just want to say, it's been an absolute pleasure to hear you. it was worth traveling coach on united. [laughter] >> the ultimate compliment. >> to hear you speak. >> the first time i've ever worried about -- [laughter] >> but you made the point that you're changing things and they also matter -- [inaudible] one of the reasons that america won the cold war is that it recognize this is a moral conflict much than anything else. and america realized tha
to negotiate. we passed the civil rights bill. there was, if you will, a precedent in terms of cooperation and climate. as the representative point out, later on that would manifest itself in what was really an unprecedented interaction between the white house and congress on dealing with the invasion to kuwait and trying to pull together a unified perspective. i think the climate -- it was not accidental. we worked awfully hard in order to maintain that. i certainly feel that the key to it was the fact that tom foley and president bush had been members of congress to gather. they had developed a personal relationship. other members of congress, including dave and others, had been there. the president was in the house -- there were personal relationships that we, frankly, in the nicest sense of the word, exploited as much as possible in order to maintain the comedy of the process. one more point, since we were commenting on him -- he was really in my opinion from at least our perspective the heart and soul of the details of this process. barry and others have talked about the importance of
know, howard baker was everett dirkson's son-in-law. and during the run up to the civil rights bill, howard is sitting up in dirkson's office, phone rings, dirkson picks it up, says -- and all howard can say is him saying, mr. president, i just can't come down tonight, i was there last night. i was there the night before, i just got to go home. hangs up. 20 minutes passed, and he hears beagles barking in the hallway outside his office. and lbj walks in with his dogs. so because he wouldn't come down to see him, johnson called a car, got in and came up to just force a conversation with dirkson. >> and lyndon johnson -- >> and we got a bill. >> and by the way, l lyndon johnson. he's so detached and disconnected from the hill, he would call, mark haleprin, famously, subcommittee chairman in the house. and say, hey, i hear the mark-up didn't go very well today. do you need any help? what can i do? do you need me to call anybody? how can i push this along? again, we're not heaping all the blame on the president. let me underline again. >> yeah. >> john boehner's counter offer was patheti
passed the civil rights bill. said there was a precedent in terms of cooperation and climate. as representatives obey pointed out later on, that is manifested in what was brilliant on precedented interaction between the white house and congress on dealing the invasion to kuwait and tried to pull together a unified respect you. it was an accidental. i really believe we work awfully hard in order to maintain. the keyword was the fact that tom foley and president bush have been members of congress to get there. they had developed a personal relationship. other members of congress, including dave and raskin kautsky had been there. when the president was in the house there were personal relationships that we were in the nascent authority exploited as much as possible in order to maintain the comedy on the process. we were commenting on dick darman. dick was from our perspective the heart and soul of the details of the process and barry and others have been talking about the budget enforcement act. wanamaker stays in the days in the white house and 89 as the new chief of staff came
historic laws including the civil rights act of 1964. what a life. jack brooks, dead at 89. bill: 25 minutes past the hour. there could soon be a major shortage of primary care doctors. the journal of the medical american association says 22% of internal medicine residents are planning to become internal medicine doctors. what does this mean to you? marc siegl joins us now with the latest on this. doctor, nice to see you. >> good to see you. bill: what does it mean. >> i want to explain to our views out there exactly what an internal medicine doctor is. we always talk about primary care. primary care is a pediatrician, obstetrician, gynecologist for women's health, family practitioner or a general internist, which is what i am. someone who does the internal organs of the pwaopbd say body and says i'm not going to become a lung specialist, i'm going to stay as a general doctor. you're sick, you're having high blood pressure, high cholesterol, i'm the guy you see. people need doctors like that. without doctors like that what are we going to do? there was another study two years ago, th
have civil and human rights for all people. the progressive message we say that we should promote dialogue and diplomacy before we ever find ourselves in military conflicts. the progressive message is about an inclusive america. all colors, all cultures, all faiths. and an america that says if you -- if you live in this country and you want to work hard, the economy should be robust and broad enough and fair enough for you to make a good run in this economy. if you work 40 hours a week, you should be able to feed your family. shouldn't have to resort to public assistance. it's talking about having to stand up for the rights of labor, the rights of working men and women. the right to be able to be paid fairly. the right to be able to go to the doctor. the right to be able to look forward to a decent, fair retirement. the right to be able to see that your children will be able to get a good education that can see them through. in other words, the progressive message is the message of an inclusive america that makes sure that our economic and our environmental lives are strong, healt
to be the chair of the judiciary committee subcommittee on constitution and human rights and civil rights. we've had a series of hearings on the issues of human rights and laws in the united states that affect them. i've also been honored to join with senator cardin of maryland, who chairs our helsinki commission senate delegation on several trips overseas where he's made human rights a major part of the agenda of that commission and of the united states. that's why one of the aspects of this bill before us is so important. sadly today in russia, country of russia we are seeing evidence of brutal, horrific treatment of individuals and abuses of human rights. senator cardin, whom i said earlier is a great voice on human rights in the senate, introduced legislation in this congress that would impose u.s. visa bans and asset freezes on those who commit gross human rights violations around the world. that was the cardin amendment, which i thought was a good one. the idea was just sefrp. those who -- just simple. those who commit such acts shouldn't be allowed to visit our country. period. this ca
engage in that follow-up if people want to help us. our community faces real civil and human rights challenges. we can face them together. host: ari ne'eman is president and co-founder of the autistic self advocacy network. it is a nonprofit organization run by and you can go to their web site at autisticadvocacy.org. >> you want to tell our viewers and listeners what to expect. we begin with a conversation einstein on thesc simpson-bowles commission. later on we will be talking about the defense capabilities section georgia at the government accountability office regarding whether it detainees at quintana mold they can be kept at one of six u.s. detention facilities on the mainland. -- at guantanamo bay and whether they can be kept at one of the six u.s. detention facilities on the mainland. this is in it. we will see you again tomorrow morning. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> coming up today, and look back at the 1990 budget deal followed by the president of the european parliament on the eu and u.
that limit civil liberties and limit the rights of women and minorities. steve harrigan has been watching things in cairo with the embassy closed. >>reporter: one section of the embassy that deals with public services was closed during business hours today. it is important to note the embassy was not under target or being attacked but if this neighborhood, really, where i am standing we had two buildings set on fire. we had a car set on fire. a lot of the spillover protesters have turned violent with rocks and tear gas thrown. a message is going out that today is not a good day to pick up your visa, tomorrow, or saturday. >>shepard: what are we expecting from president morsi's address? >>reporter: well, it is a remarkable situation where you have a country ramming through a constitution in one day's time if an attempt to head off more protests. the exact affect could be the reverse, to inflame the protests that we have seen the past seven days. this is tape recording and there will be a explanation of the extraordinary power and the explanation of the constitution. it will go to the peopl
the leadership conference on civil and human rights, the wounded warrior project, the hindu american foundation the islamic center of -- society of north america, the jewish federations of america, the national catholic social justice lobby, and the veterans of foreign wars. let me share a couple of letters. bernard from franklin county in my state wrote, "i'm concerned about recent grumblings about former senator santorum and others. i was a lot of regard for the a.d.a. and a a wareness of discrimination against people with disabilities. when will the senate take up this u.n. resolution? what can i do to convince oppositional senators that this is an important and necessary resolution for people with disabilities, especially our nation's veterans? well, bernard, my colleagues on the other side of the aisle -- nor mccain, former majority leader bob dole, both of whom served our country honorably in the armed forces, and 21 veterans organizations agree with you. this should be an opportunity for all americans to come together and show the world we're committed to ensuring the basic human dignity
: right now new violence in syria's civil war. state media there saying 29 students and a teacher were killed when a mortar slammed into a school outside damascus. and we have this. new amateur video said to be showing a government warplane on a bombing run over a damascus suburb. it is home to many rebels and their supporters. we can not confirm the authenticity of that video but we have no reasondoubt it e. conor powell live from jerusalem. >> reporter: jon, it appears the war in syria is entering a new phase. in recent days and weeks the syrian government faced a real military setback as rebels begin to advance towards damascus. that is one of the reason we've seen intense fighting around damascus and more and more of the syrian jets making bombing runs trying to attack the syrian opposition groups. the fear if the syrian government, the assad regime feels their grip is beginning to loosen and slip away that they will turn to chemical weapons. there is evidence according to u.s. around national intelligence officials say that the assad regime is beginning to prepare their chemical a
been critical to getting the word out. video like the one posted on-line. this one right here. shows peaceful demonstrations against president bashir aul awes yad that began last year and spiralled into now what is happening. >> activists regularly posting these videos and articles about the civil war that is taking place there. often these are really just only the images we are able to get from the front lines wrush see it there. she is co-founder and managing editor of syrian deeply.org. you're a former correspondent with abc and bloomberg as well. you have seen some of the -- what is taking place there. what do you make of the civil war? >> my heart breaks like the ones in arwa's piece. what we felt we had to do was to step out of the story for a moment and just look at technology, look at what's coming out from user-generated images, from voices of syrians trying to tell their stories and just collect it in one place, so we decided to build syria deeply. it's part news aggregator, part backgrounder and part original reporting. what we felt we needed do was to give people more bac
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)